PIV and PEV

Introduction

It’s not uncommon for people to say that men have a natural desire for vaginal intercourse and women have a natural desire for oral sex. But the truth is more complicated than that. Sexism affects our sexual desires on both subtle and explicit levels: we’re told about what’s attractive by society, we’re socialized into thinking certain sexual acts are “feminine” or “masculine,” and so on.

PIV and Radical Feminism 

Katelyn Burns, a trans woman and journalist who writes about trans issues, described the concept in her article for VICE. She wrote that PIV is a concept that can be found in the radical feminist community. Radical feminism as a movement seeks to dismantle patriarchy and male dominance, which it sees as having a negative impact on women’s lives.

What does PIV mean?

“PIV” is a common term in the radical feminist community. PIV stands for “penis-in-vagina,” which refers to heterosexual sex. It’s often used interchangeably with the acronym “sex,” and it’s generally understood as a synonym for vaginal intercourse.

You may have heard this term in reference to men’s rights activists (MRAs), who use it to describe themselves as victims of misandry (the hatred of men). MRAs claim that feminists hate men, and that therefore any form of criticism directed at them must be motivated by misandry rather than legitimate concern about harmful behavior or attitudes. They also say that many women do not like PIV, but they are too afraid to express their true feelings because they’re brainwashed by radical feminism into believing it’s immoral or unhealthy—even though there are no scientific studies proving either claim! This argument is usually made using inflammatory language and insults against anyone who disagrees with them; these tactics are called “manarchism.”

Some radical feminists believe that penises should not enter vaginas because they view it as a form of oppression.

The idea that PIV is bad for women has been around for years, but was popularized by Andrea Dworkin in her book Intercourse in 1987 and then later by Naomi Wolf in The Beauty Myth. In her book, Dworkin writes:

“Pornography as sex education is coarsening our children and brutalizing their sexual development.”

She continues:

“Men’s violence against women and girls is fed by pornography… Pornography is now hard-wired into the erotic lives of men who have no choice but to live on its terms.”

According to some radical feminists, women have been socially constructed to enjoy pain during sex.

According to some radical feminists, women have been socially constructed to enjoy pain during sex. How many times has a young female virgin been told that sex will hurt your first couple of times? In our society, women are taught that their bodies should be used as objects of men’s pleasure. We talk very little about lubrication, foreplay, and taking one’s time when first having sex to ease the pain of having a penis inside of you for the first time. Women are conditioned to believe that it is normal and natural for them to experience sexual pleasure when they receive pain.

What does PIV mean?

Many cisgender heterosexual women take pleasure in vaginal intercourse (or “penis-in-vagina sex,” as it’s often called).

While PIV is typically thought of as a male-driven act, many cisgender heterosexual women take pleasure in vaginal intercourse (or “penis-in-vagina sex,” as it’s often called). While there’s no denying that some women feel more comfortable with PIV than others, this isn’t a sign that they’re more submissive to men or less feminist than their peers. In fact, the opposite might be true: Women who enjoy PIV may actually be more likely to have orgasms while having sex with their partners.

While it may seem like an obvious choice for those seeking sexual pleasure and satisfaction, not everyone enjoys PIV. Some people are simply not physically attracted to penises; others prefer other kinds of stimulation (like oral sex) over penetration itself; still others experience pain during vaginal intercourse due to trauma or inadequate lubrication—all valid reasons why someone would choose another type of sexual activity over something like penile penetration.

The importance of making sure you’re getting what you want out of your sexual relationships can’t be overstated—after all, there’s nothing wrong with putting yourself first! If this means avoiding certain kinds of sex in favor of something else entirely that makes you feel more comfortable and confident as an individual then so be it!

The vagina can be conditioned for sex.

The vagina is a muscle that can be strengthened through exercise, and can also be trained to enjoy intercourse. The vagina is the most sensitive part of the female body, and it’s also the most important part of your body.

Some radical feminists say that male desire is what pushes women into having PIV sex, even if they don’t want it.

One radical feminist writer named Andrea Dworkin wrote about how men force women to have PIV sex by threatening them with their lives and lives of their children. This threat can come in the form of physical violence or psychological violence such as threats about withholding money or food from a woman and her children.

Society plays a huge role in shaping what we’re told is sexy, and a lot of pornography is made from a male perspective.

Even though pornography is made from a male perspective, it’s also consumed by many women. This is because society plays a huge role in shaping what we’re told is sexy, and a lot of pornography is made from a male perspective.

However, it’s important to understand that the porn industry does not cater to female desire; rather, it reflects male desire. When you see two men having sex, or one woman getting penetrated by multiple men at once—you are looking at what men want to see. Because women aren’t the main consumers of pornography—in fact, they make up less than 40% of all viewers—the content tends to be oriented towards what sells: male-centric fantasies about sex between men and women (and occasionally trans people).

These feminists also believe that women are being coerced into participating in PIV by men who want to make them pregnant — or “breed” them.

One of the most common criticisms of the PIV-hating movement is that it’s sexist. Some feminists argue that women are being bullied into having sex against their will, and this is why they want to eliminate PIV as a sexual activity. However, these feminists also believe that women are being coerced into participating in PIV by men who want to make them pregnant — or “breed” them.

While there may be some truth to this claim, it’s important to remember that sexism isn’t just something that happens to women; it permeates every aspect of our culture and affects everyone. And while historical sexism has certainly done a lot of damage, I would argue that today’s society continues to perpetuate gender roles and stereotypes which can harm both genders equally—and sometimes more so than historical sexism ever did!

Penis In Vagina

PIV and PEV

Sexism affects our sexual desires on both subtle and explicit levels.

Sexism is a problem in all areas of life, including sexuality. It’s a problem for both men and women, cisgender people and transgender people alike.

Sexism is so pervasive that it can be difficult to identify when it’s happening; often sexism happens subtly or covertly, as opposed to overtly or overtly aggressively. Yet here are some examples of ways that sexism affects our sexual desires:

  • A man who feels he should be sexually aggressive because he was taught that women want men who take charge during sex may feel that he has license to do whatever he wants with women because they will enjoy anything he does if they like him enough (or so he thinks).
  • A woman who feels pressure not only from her partner but also from society at large to have an orgasm during every sexual encounter may feel shame if she doesn’t reach climax during each encounter (even though this isn’t true for all women).

Conclusion

So, what’s the takeaway? Well, it’s that sexism affects our sexual desires on both subtle and explicit levels. That doesn’t mean we should get rid of sex altogether (though some radical feminists have certainly tried). It just means that we need to be aware of these issues when looking at how women are portrayed in mainstream media or talking about their pleasure during intercourse — because they’re not going away anytime soon.

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Author: Esther Jordan

Esther Jordan has been a writer ever since she can remember. She has always loved the free gift of self-expression through journaling, creating stories, and sharing life experiences in front of audiences. Public speaking and creating content has been a strong suit of hers since high school. Immediately after college, she received a paid position as an search engine optimization (SEO) writer in 2010 when SEO was still a very brick and mortar concept for a lot of small businesses. It was a time of do-it-yourself websites and online magic that everyone wanted and either referred to it as SEO or pay-per-click (PPC).