Bacterial Vaginosis STD

Is BV an STD? Can BV turn into an STD? Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is not a sexually transmitted disease. It cannot be spread through sexual contact with a male or female. However, sex can increase the chances of a bacterial growth. This is including sex with new or multiple partners.

Bacterial Vaginosis STI

Is BV an STI? BV is not a sexually transmitted infection either. But it can increase your chances of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

BV is caused by an imbalance of bacteria in the vagina. It’s common, especially among young women, and it’s often not serious. However, BV can cause unpleasant symptoms such as vaginal discharge that smells like fish or amines.

BV is not the same as gonorrhea, chlamydia, or HIV—all of which are STIs.

STD BV

BV is an imbalance of bacteria in the vagina. It’s not clear what causes this imbalance, but sex may play a role. Some women also get BV without being sexually active.

BV is an infection caused by bacteria. It’s not clear what causes the imbalance in the vagina, but sex may play a role. Some women also get BV without being sexually active.

BV can be caused by douching with water or cleaning products, using an IUD (birth control device), or having unprotected sex with multiple partners.

Is Bacterial Vaginosis an STD?

BV can make you more likely to get other STIs, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, and HIV. Women who have female sexual partners have increased risk of getting BV.

  • BV can make you more likely to get other STIs, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia and HIV.
  • If a woman has female sexual partners, she is at increased risk of getting BV.

BV is caused by an imbalance of bacteria in the vagina. The vagina normally contains many types of bacteria but only certain ones are healthy for you. When there are too few healthy bacteria in your vagina (due to pregnancy or menstruation), or if new strains move into your body through contact with semen or vaginal fluids from someone who already has BV — this may cause infection symptoms that include:

  • discomfort during sex, burning sensation when urinating and discharge from the vagina (frothy) that smells bad – like fishy or yeasty;
  • very rarely people with no symptoms at all!

What is BV STD

BV increases the amount of some bacteria in your vagina that are linked to STIs. It also makes it easier for germs to enter your body during sexual intercourse.

BV is caused by an imbalance of bacteria in the vagina. It’s not an STD, but it can make you more likely to get other STIs. If you have BV, your body will have more of some types of bacteria that are linked to STIs like chlamydia and gonorrhea. And if you already have an STI, having BV makes it easier for germs from that infection to spread into your body during sexual intercourse.

Is BV an STI

You can help prevent BV by avoiding sex or by having protected sex using condoms and dental dams every time you have sex.

The good news is that you can help prevent BV by avoiding sex or by having protected sex using condoms and dental dams every time you have sex. If you want to avoid the risk of getting an STI, use protection the whole time!

As for BV itself, it’s not a reason to be ashamed. It’s normal; we all get it sometimes. And just like any other kind of infection in your body, there are ways to treat it and keep it under control so that you can get back to feeling like yourself soon.

BV STI

If you’re treated for BV and still have symptoms, ask your doctor about testing for other STIs.

If you’re treated for bacterial vaginosis and still have symptoms, ask your doctor about testing for other STIs. Bacterial vaginosis can be treated with antibiotics, but the treatment doesn’t always work. If you find that the symptoms come back after treatment, talk to your doctor about getting a prescription for a longer course of antibiotics or other medications that might help clear up the infection and prevent it from coming back.

If you are pregnant and have bacterial vaginosis, it can cause problems with your pregnancy and childbirth.

is bacterial vaginosis an std

BV or STD

There are several reasons to seek treatment when you do have BV.

If you suspect that you have BV, it’s important to seek treatment.

BV has been associated with an increased risk of contracting other STIs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea. These infections can lead to serious reproductive health complications if left untreated. In fact, studies have shown that women with BV are three times more likely to contract gonorrhea than women without the infection; likewise, they’re five times more likely to be infected with chlamydia.

When pregnant or trying to conceive (TTC), BV poses additional risks for both mom and baby: Some research suggests that having BV during pregnancy could increase the chance of premature delivery. Other studies suggest that babies born from mothers who had untreated bacterial vaginosis were more likely to develop respiratory infections in childhood than babies born from mothers who didn’t have bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy.

bv std

It’s also possible for bacterial vaginosis to cause a dangerous inflammation within the reproductive organs themselves—a condition called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can lead not only to infertility but also ectopic pregnancy (when an embryo develops outside of the uterus) and chronic pelvic pain (if scarring causes adhesions between organs). We hope this answers the question, is bacterial vaginosis an STD or an STI. If you have any questions about BV STD, don’t hesitate to ask one of our team members. We’re here to help.

Medically Reviewed by on August 1, 2022

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Author: Esther Jordan

Esther Jordan has been a writer ever since she can remember. She has always loved the free gift of self-expression through journaling, creating stories, and sharing life experiences in front of audiences. Public speaking and creating content has been a strong suit of hers since high school. Immediately after college, she received a paid position as an search engine optimization (SEO) writer in 2010 when SEO was still a very brick and mortar concept for a lot of small businesses. It was a time of do-it-yourself websites and online magic that everyone wanted and either referred to it as SEO or pay-per-click (PPC).